My contract with my current hosting provider is just about to expire, and I’m pretty sure I’m moving on to someone new.

If you’ve never had a website before, you may not be familiar with an internet host, or web host.  A web host offers a the service of keeping your website up and running.  “Weakonomics.com” is my website, and in order for you to see it, it most be hosted on the internet somewhere.  I could host it myself, by setting up some software on a computer to handle everything.  But doing so would be like building your own car, instead of buying one.  99% of us are better off buying.

The web host also keeps leases my domain for me.  While I said Weakonomics.com is my website, I technically lease the space.  The content you see and read is mine, but the location you view it from is leased.  Imagine your local grocery store, they own the stuff inside but they are leasing the space from whatever real estate company that owns the shopping mall.  Weakonomics.com is a domain name, and I pay my web host to use that space.

There are a multitude of services offered by web hosts, however I do not need much.  I need one that will register my domain for me, and install the software I need on my web server.  If you’ve heard of Word Press, they are a company that makes web server software that makes it easy to do blogs, like Weakonomics.  The web hosts offer various amounts of bandwidth and capacity, which are the amount of traffic I can take on my site and the amount of data I can store there, respectively.  I’m no Google, I’m not even a Simple Dollar, so I only need minimal amounts of both.

All this sounds quite complicated and overwhelming, and at first I felt the same way.  Thankfully Trent from The Simple Dollar gave me some guidance, and I settled down with a web host called BlueHost. BlueHost was so helpful in every manner.  Their customer service is top-notch.  I ran into few troubles when setting up everything I needed for Weakonomics.com last year.  But BlueHost is one of the pricier services out there at $7 a month.

$7 a month doesn’t sound like much, but in the world of web hosting, the basic plans can be as cheap as $3, with an average being around $5.  You get what you pay for at $7 with BlueHost, but I don’t need everything they offer now.  A difference of $2 a month is pocket change, but it’s my pocket change.  So I’m looking to move on from BlueHost.  I know there are many of you out there with your own blogs and websites.  Please let me know, either in the comments or email (philip@weakonomics.com), who you are using and how you feel about their service.  If you host ads for their service on your site, let me know as well, I will use them when I sign up so you can get your referral credit.

I’m currently interested in GoDaddy and HostGator, but open to all others.

If all goes well, you won’t notice a thing changing.  I’ll let everyone know when it’s done.  Thanks and have a great weekend!

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categories: personal, technology, weakend